Friday, 27 December 2013

SOURCES OF VITAL STATISTICS IN INDIA


I ‐  SOURCES OF VITAL STATISTICS IN INDIA 

   The important sources of vital statistics in India besides the Population Census are   (1)  
Civil  Registration  System;(2)  Demographic  Sample  Surveys  such  as  those  conducted  by  the 
National Sample Surveys Organization(NSSO); (3)Sample Registration System (SRS) and (4) Health 
Surveys, such as   National Family Health Surveys, (NFHS) and District Level Household Surveys 
(DLHS‐RCH  )  conducted  for  assessing  progress  under  the  Reproductive  and  Child  Health 
programme.  This manual discusses the salient features of each of these sources of vital statistics 
and their strengths and limitations. 
Civil Registration System    

1.2  According to the United Nations, civil registration is defined as the continuous permanent 
and compulsory recording of the occurrence of vital events, like, live births, deaths, foetal deaths, 
marriages,  divorces  as  well  as  annulments,  judicial separation,  adoptions,  legitimations  and 
recognitions. Civil registration is performed under a law, decree or regulation so as to provide a 
legal basis to the records and certificates made from the system, which has got several civil uses 
in  the  personal  life  of  individual  citizens.  Moreover,  the  information  collected  through  the 
registration process provides very useful and important vital statistics also on a continuous basis 
at the national level starting from the smallest administrative unit. In fact, obtaining detailed vital 
statistics on a  regular basis is one of the major functions of the Civil Registration System (CRS) in 
several countries of the world. Vital records obtained under CRS have got administrative uses in 
designing and implementing public health programmes and carrying out social, demographic and 
historical research. For an individual, the birth registration records provide legal proof of identity 
and  civil status,  age, nationality, dependency status  etc., on which depend  a wide  variety of 
rights.  
   
1.3  The office of the Registrar General of India was created in 1951 and the vital statistics 
department was transferred to this office from the Director of Health Services in 1960. On the 
deliberations and recommendations of various committees, the Registration of Births and Deaths 
Act  (1969)  was  enacted  by  Parliament  to  enforce  uniform  civil  registration  throughout  the 
country.  
 National Sample Survey
1.4   Data on fertility and mortality from the census are not very reliable and they are also 
available only once in ten years. In the absence of reliable data from the civil registration system 
(CRS), the need for reliable vital statistics at national and state levels is being met through sample 
surveys launched from time to time. At the instance of the then Prime Minister Shri Jawaharlal 
Nehru,  a  large scale sample survey agency known as National Sample Survey (NSS) came into 
existence in 1950 on the recommendations of the National Income Committee chaired by Late 
Professor P. C. Mahalanobis. In the 1950’s and 1960’s,  the National Sample Survey attempted to 
provide reliable  estimates  of  birth  and  death rates through  its regular rounds. However, the 
release of 1961 census data indicated that the birth rates and death rates and   consequently, the 
growth rates were often not estimated correctly. Many analysts, at that point of time, felt that 
the one time retrospective recall surveys such as National Sample survey may not be able to 
estimate the vital rates correctly. This resulted in a search for alternative mechanism estimate 
vital rates.  The sample registration system (SRS) was one such attempt. 
 Sample Registration System (SRS)  

1.5  The Government of India, in the late 1960s, initiated the Sample Registration System that 
is based on a Dual Recording System. In the Sample Registration System, there is a continuous 
enumeration of births and deaths in a sample of villages/urban blocks by a resident part‐time 
enumerator and then, an independent six monthly retrospective survey by a full time supervisor. 
The data obtained through these two sources are matched. The unmatched and partially matched 
events are re‐verified in the field to get the correct number of events.  At present, the Sample 
Registration System (SRS) provides reliable annual data on fertility and mortality at the state and 
national levels for rural and urban areas separately. In this survey, the sample units, villages in 
rural areas and urban blocks in urban areas are replaced once in ten years.  
Health Surveys  

1.6  In the past about a decade or so, a few important sources for demographic data have 
emerged. These are the National Family Health Surveys (NFHS) and the District Level Household 
Surveys (DLHS) conducted for the evaluation of reproductive and child Health programmes. Three 
rounds of NFHS surveys have since been completed. These provide estimates inter‐alia of fertility, 
child mortality and a number of health parameters relating to infants and children at state level. 
They  also  provide  information  on  the  availability  of  health  and  family  planning services  to 
pregnant mothers and other women in reproductive ages. The DLHS provide information at the 
district level on a number of indicators relating to child health, reproductive health problems and 
the quality of services available to them.   Three rounds of DLHS surveys have been conducted so 
far. In each of the first two rounds, the survey was conducted in two phases spread over two 
years, wherein, under each phase of the survey, half of the districts in a state had been covered.  
However, in the third round of the DLHS survey (2007‐08), all the districts were covered in one 
phase. 

1.7  The chapters that follow discuss in detail the data emerging from the above sources, their  
strengths, limitations, the organizational details  and the data collected.