Saturday, 30 November 2013

Basic research

Basic research is about understanding the various processes between memory, learning, and knowledge. It is about finding information simply to find information. While it may become applied later, it is not sought out for its application to current events. With basic research, researchers choose to research topic of interest to them. It is about figuring out the answer without necessarily figuring out an answer that is applicable to curing a type of disease or to a current problem that they are trying to solve in science today. It is about finding knowledge. It is learning for learning’s sake. To learn because they are interested in how something works and want to find out how it works.
Basic research is about understanding the various processes between memory, learning, and knowledge. It is about finding information simply to find information. While it may become applied later, it is not sought out for its application to current events. With basic research, researchers choose to research topic of interest to them. It is about figuring out the answer without necessarily figuring out an answer that is applicable to curing a type of disease or to a current problem that they are trying to solve in science today. It is about finding knowledge. It is learning for learning’s sake. To learn because they are interested in how something works and want to find out how it works.
Basic   Research:       
Basic (aka fundamental or pure) research is driven by a scientist's curiosity or interest
in a scientific question. The main motivation is to expand man's knowledge, not to
create or invent something. There is no obvious commercial value to the discoveries
that result from basic research.
For example, basic science investigations probe for answers to questions such as:
• How did the universe begin?
• What are protons, neutrons, and electrons composed of?
• How do slime molds reproduce?
• What is the specific genetic code of the fruit fly?
Most scientists believe that a basic, fundamental understanding of all branches of
science is needed in order for progress to take place. In other words, basic research
lays down the foundation for the applied science that follows. If basic work is done
first, then applied spin-offs often eventually result from this research. As Dr. George
Smoot of LBNL says, "People cannot foresee the future well enough to predict what's
going to develop from basic research. If we only did applied research, we would still
be making better spears."